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Post-Doctoral Fellows


Pamela Prickett
Office: Lovett Hall 402A
Phone: 713-348-2841
Email: prickett@rice.edu 
  
Pamela Prickett

Pamela Prickett is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology at Rice University. She uses ethnographic and historical methods to understand how poverty and inequality are experienced, structured, and reproduced within urban communities. Her current book project, Believing in South Central, draws on more than five years of fieldwork in an African American Muslim community in a low-income neighborhood in Los Angeles. The book examines the everyday lives of the pious urban poor, including the ways they draw on each other and local religious organizations for social support in light of a changing urban landscape. Her work has appeared in Gender & Society and City & Community. She completed her PhD in sociology from UCLA in June 2015. 

Graduate Student Fellows


Dan Bolger
Office: Lovett Hall 402
Phone: 713-348-3276
Email: dan.bolger@rice.edu 

Dan Bolger

Dan Bolger graduated Summa Cum Laude from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in 2013 with an M.A. in Mental Health Counseling and an M.A. in Christian Studies. He also has a B.S. in Psychology from John Brown University. Before rejoining the RPLP as a graduate student, Dan worked as an RPLP Post-Baccalaureate Fellow, during which time he worked on the Religion among Scientists in International Context (RASIC) project and the Religion and Inequality in Science Education (RISE) project. Dan's research interests include social stratification, religion, race/ethnicity, and qualitative methods.
DiDi
Office: Lovett Hall 403
Phone: 713-348-3276
Email: di.di@rice.edu 

Di Di

Di Di earned a bachelor's degree in law from Tongji University in 2012 and is now a PhD candidate in the sociology department at Rice University. Her research interests include immigrants' religiosity, religions in China, race, and ethnicity. She is currently studying the conversion of Chinese and Indian immigrants to Christianity.  
Simranjit-Khalsa 
Office: Lovett Hall 403
Phone: 713-348-3276
Email: simranjit.khalsa@rice.edu 
  
Simranjit Khalsa

Simranjit Khalsa completed a B.S. in Sociology and Planning, Public Policy, and Management at the University of Oregon in 2013. She is interested in how people negotiate religious difference as well as the growth of new religious movements. She completed a departmental thesis in sociology entitled "Resolving Religious Difference: Christians and Non-Christians in Intimate Relationships" through which she explored the beliefs of partners in such relationships, the religious differences between partners, and the extent to which those differences affected their relationship.
 
Office: Lovett Hall 402
Phone: 713-348-3276
Email: sharan.k.mehta@rice.edu 
  
Sharan Mehta

 
Office: Lovett Hall 402
Phone: 713-348-3276
Email: esmeralda.sanchez@rice.edu 
  
Esmeralda Sanchez

Cleve Tinsley 
Office: Lovett Hall 402
Email: cvt4@rice.edu
  
Cleve Tinsley

Cleve V. Tinsley IV is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Religion at Rice University. His academic research explores critical understandings of the wider social scientific and historical approaches to the study of religion in general and African-American religion in particular. More specifically, Cleve's research focuses on religion and identity construction in African American communities. He is a recipient of the Fund for Theological Education's (FTE) Doctoral Fellowship and, prior to enrolling at Rice, earned his Master of Divinity (MDiv) at Princeton Theological Seminary. In addition to being a fellow with the Religion and Public Life Program, Cleve is also a graduate and teaching assistant with the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL), whose founding director is Cleve's doctoral advisor Dr. Anthony B. Pinn.

Visiting Fellows



Office: Lovett Hall 402A
Phone: 713-348-2841
Email: hilary.davidson@rice.edu 
  
Hilary Davidson

Hilary Davidson is a visiting graduate student research fellow with the Religion and Public Life Program and a sociology Ph.D. candidate at the University of Notre Dame. Drawing on interview and survey data from the National Study of Youth and Religion, her dissertation uncovers implicit cultural narratives operating in the lives of young Americans as they ponder and negotiate what makes for a life worth living. On the whole, her work is an examination of the cultural assumptions and taken-for-granted meanings that shape our lives and drive action with research interests including religion, emerging adulthood, generosity, and social stratification. She is the coauthor of The Paradox of Generosity (Oxford University Press 2014) and Lost in Transition (Oxford University Press 2011) in addition to academic journal articles.