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Fellowships and Employment

Interested in working with the RPLP? 

The RPLP accepts applications on an on-going basis for Undergraduate Research Fellows, who work directly with Rice faculty on research related to religion and public life. Fellows are involved in all aspects of RPLP activities, including research initiatives, writing and editing, project management, and event planning.  See below for more information.

Research Positions

Undergraduate Research Fellows 

Undergrads Chicago(1)

The Religion and Public Life Program (RPLP), housed in the Social Sciences Research Institute at Rice University, accepts applications for undergraduate research fellows on an on-going basis. Contact Hayley Hemstreet (hjh2@rice.edu) for more information.

Previous RPLP undergraduate fellows have gone on to successful programs in medicine, education, nonprofits, healthcare, policy research, business, and consulting.

RPLP is much more than a typical research experience. Dr. Ecklund truly cares about making sure that everyone involved is learning from the RPLP experience and puts a lot of effort into making sure that we are able to try as many things related to sociology research as possible. – Kaitlin Barnes (‘14)

More than just the networks and resources that are made available, my favorite thing about RPLP is just how rewarding the work is. I truly feel like my work as a part of this team is furthering our society's understanding of the intersection between religion and science. – Shirin Lakhani (’14)

[This experience] brought me into direct contact with numerous perspectives on faith, religion, and spirituality. ... While the public sphere tends to polarize religious groups, I feel confident in my ability to bridge divisions and seek compromise between opposing worldviews. – Daniel Cortez (’15)

Most undergraduates can discuss sociological work, but I ... lived it for three years. Anyone interested in a sociology PhD should try and have an experience that is similar to mine. – Jacob Hernandez (’15)